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Perhaps being bilingual doesn’t do quite as much we thought for the brain

February 28, 2015

Not that it’s a bad thing by any means, but it could be that it’s not the total brain-workout we’ve thought.

 

Is Bilingualism Really an Advantage?

The New Yorker

By Maria Konnikova

JANUARY 22, 2015

BY MARIA KONNIKOVA

In 1922, in “Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus,” the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein wrote, “The limits of my language mean the limits of my world.” The words that we have at our disposal affect what we see—and the more words there are, the better our perception. When we learn to speak a different language, we learn to see a bigger world.

Many modern language researchers agree with that premise. Not only does speaking multiple languages help us to communicate but bilingualism (or multilingualism) may actually confer distinct advantages to the developing brain. Because a bilingual child switches between languages, the theory goes, she develops enhanced executive control, or the ability to effectively manage what are called higher cognitive processes, such as problem-solving, memory, and thought. She becomes better able to inhibit some responses, promote others, and generally emerges with a more flexible and agile mind. It’s a phenomenon that researchers call the bilingual advantage.

Please read more here.

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